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Musings of an Anglican/Episcopal Priest

Month: August 2004 (page 1 of 2)

Former frat house has become

Former frat house has become the nation’s first residence for Orthodox Christian students

Filed under: Orthodox Christianity— Jacobse @ 4:24 pm
Old party pad at U. of I. is now focused on faith

By Manya A. Brachear
Tribune staff reporter

August 20, 2004

CHAMPAIGN – Waving a silver cross dipped in holy water and entwined with basil branches and a horsehair brush, a Greek Orthodox priest on Friday will convert a fraternity’s former party house into the nation’s first residence hall for Orthodox Christian college students.

The blessing of the home, formerly known as “The Palace” among the University of Illinois’ sororities and fraternities, will allow Orthodox students raised in different ethnic traditions to live and worship as one, a symbol of the unity that some Orthodox churches in North America have been trying to achieve for years.

Students who have signed up to live in the house–eight so far–include Greek, Indian and Egyptian Orthodox.

“It’s a model of what’s to come,” said Rev. George Pyle, the Greek Orthodox priest who oversees the university’s Orthodox Christian Fellowship. “The hymns might sound different, but the message is the same.”

Way to go guys.. .

Americans win support Two leading


Americans win support

Two leading figures in the Anglican world this week gave support to conservative parishes in America who are opposed to their Church’s decision to consecrate the Anglican Communion’s first active gay bishop.

In a move that will give dissenting parishes greater legitimacy and confidence and increase the pressure on the American Primate, Frank Griswold, the former Archbishop of Canterbury, Lord Carey, and the Ugandan Primate, Archbishop Henry Orombi, have agreed to provide them with oversight.

[Listening to: Pretty Polly – Dirk Powell – If I Go Ten Thousand Miles (4:26)]

Sunday trading leads to ‘unstable


Sunday trading leads to ‘unstable families’

Ten years of Sunday shopping has left parents feeling pressured to work on weekends and children growing up in unstable families, a reinvigorated campaign to restrict Sunday trading claimed this week.

Drawing on new poll results, Keep Sunday Special (KSS) campaigners this week said parents were the hardest hit by pressures to work on Sundays since the inception of big store Sunday shopping in Britain.

The NOP poll, interviewing 1,912 adults nationally, showed that 71 per cent of respondents said they “would not be bothered at all”, or “not very much” if larger shops closed on Sundays and trading reverted to pre-1994 scenario where the market was left open to local convenience shops only.

From Midwest Conservative Journal: DARKEST

From Midwest Conservative Journal:

DARKEST AMERICA
Ladies and gentlemen! Give it up for…Ugandan imperialism!

The Rt Revd Evans Kisekka, the Bishop of Luweero Diocese, has my full blessing and support in receiving the clergy from St James Church, Newport Beach, and All Saints’ Church, Long Beach, California, USA. These clergy are canonically resident in the Luweero Diocese and are priests and deacons in good standing of the Church of Uganda.

It was the Christian thing to do since we don’t recognize the ECUSA anymore:

On 20 November 2003, the House of Bishops of the Church of the Province of Uganda (Anglican) made the following resolutions:

“The Church of the Province of Uganda (Anglican) cuts her relationship and Communion with the Episcopal Church of the United States of America (ECUSA) on their resolution and consequent action of consecrating and enthroning an openly confessed homosexual Gene Robinson as the Bishop of New Hampshire Diocese in the Anglican Communion; and with any other Province that shall follow suit.”

[Listening to: Hunky Dory/Ryestraw – Dirk Powell – If I Go Ten Thousand Miles (3:09)]

Anglican Conciliarity

Anglican Conciliarity
read it all (PDF file)

Any attempt to move the Anglican Communion to acceptance of a central, ‘monarchical’ authority with the power to make decisions that would be binding on the member churches is doomed to failure. The vocation of Anglicanism lies in its distinctive approach to questions of authority where primacy, collegiality and conciliarity all have their integrity and are interrelated and mutually constrained.

However, this does not mean that the Communion can never have more than moral authority for its members. Conciliarity that lacks mandatory authority nevertheless has the potential to develop forms of mutual obligation (protocols of consultation, leading to common action or perhaps restraint, together with the sanctions that would apply in circumstances where they are not observed) that are intended to promote the common good. The common good of the Anglican Communion should be seen in ecclesiological and missiological terms, i.e. as the conditions that are required for the Communion as a whole and its member churches to grow in the four dimensions of the Church (unity, holiness, catholicity and apostolicity) and to carry out the mission of the gospel in the world. However, the common good of the Communion would need to be set within the context of the common good of the whole Church of Christ – which means that ecumenical considerations would also be taken seriously.

Such protocols may be freely accepted by the constituent bodies, following their own canonical processes. When so accepted they would become binding unless and until repudiated by a similar canonical process. A majority (threshold to be agreed) of the provinces may insist that membership of the Communion requires acceptance and observance of these protocols. Presumably, the consent of the Archbishop of Canterbury would be required before this condition could be implemented.

Conciliarity presupposes communion. Communion (koinonia) is a multi-faceted, dynamic and graduated reality that expresses and sustains the nature of the Church as the Body of Christ. The communion of the Anglican Communion goes well beyond the baptismal communion that pertains (e.g.) between Anglicans and Roman Catholics. Communion between Anglican provinces involves the interchangeability of ministries and therefore of Eucharists (any impairment of this can only be regarded as a temporary anomaly).

[Listening to: One Arm Steve – Widespread Panic – ‘Til The Medicine Takes (3:26)]

Statement from the Archbishop of

Statement from the Archbishop of the Church of the Province of Uganda

The Rt Revd Evans Kisekka, the Bishop of Luweero Diocese, has my full blessing and support in receiving the clergy from St James Church, Newport Beach, and All Saints’ Church, Long Beach, California, USA. These clergy are canonically resident in the Luweero Diocese and are priests and deacons in good standing of the Church of Uganda.

On 20 November 2003, the House of Bishops of the Church of the Province of Uganda (Anglican) made the following resolutions:

“The Church of the Province of Uganda (Anglican) cuts her relationship and Communion with the Episcopal Church of the United States of America (ECUSA) on their resolution and consequent action of consecrating and enthroning an openly confessed homosexual Gene Robinson as the Bishop of New Hampshire Diocese in the Anglican Communion; and with any other Province that shall follow suit.”

“Mindful of the fact that there are a number of dioceses, parishes and congregations in the ECUSA, which are opposed to the resolution and action taken by their convention and are determined to remain faithful to the teaching of scripture on human sexuality, to those dear brothers and sisters, we extend our solidarity with them and assure them of our continued prayers.”

[Listening to: Everything You Want – Vertical Horizon – Everything You Want (4:17)]

Presiding Bishop conveys concern about

Presiding Bishop conveys concern about pastoral boundaries, affirms LA bishop’s ministry of reconciliation

by Bob Williams

From the Episcopal News Service (ENS) of the Episcopal Church of the United States of America (ECUSA)

Emphasizing the Anglican Primates’ agreement that “bishops are to respect the boundaries of one another’s dioceses and provinces,” the Presiding Bishop of ECUSA, the Most Revd Frank T Griswold, today sent a letter of concern to the Archbishop of the Church of the Province of Uganda, the Most Revd Henry L Orombi, after a third Southern California congregation yesterday aligned with the Ugandan Diocese of Luweero.

Presiding Bishop Griswold also issued the following statement to media:

“I am saddened by the action of clergy and members of three congregations in the Diocese of Los Angeles and their desire to separate themselves from the life of the Episcopal Church. I know how assiduously Bishop Bruno has sought to be a minister of reconciliation and a pastor to those of all views within the life of the Diocese of Los Angeles and its 147 diverse congregations.

[Listening to: Everything You Want – Vertical Horizon – Everything You Want (4:17)]

VA hospitals seen as potential

VA hospitals seen as potential terrorist targets

By Jerry Seper
THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Veterans hospitals in the United States are potential targets of al Qaeda terrorists and other Islamic militants reluctant to attack more-heavily defended U.S. military installations, the FBI and Department of Homeland Security said.
In a new nationwide terrorism bulletin sent this week to law enforcement officials and security personnel, the two federal agencies said that while there was no specific credible evidence that Department of Veterans Affairs hospitals had been targeted, there was intelligence data — including persistent reports of “suspicious activity” at medical facilities nationwide — to issue the alert.

[Listening to: This Time – Uncle Kracker – Seventy Two & Sunny (3:42)]

Carey tour adds to US fears of gay schism

Telegraph %7C News %7C Carey tour adds to US fears of gay schism: “Carey tour adds to US fears of gay schism%0D%0ABy Jonathan Petre%2C Religion Correspondent%0D%0A%28Filed%3A 23%2F08%2F2004%29 %0D%0A%0D%0ALord Carey%2C the former Archbishop of Canterbury%2C will provoke a fresh storm over homosexuality in the Church next month by blessing hundreds of American traditionalists who are boycotting their own pro-gay bishop.%0D%0AThis high-profile intervention by Lord Carey will highlight the growing polarisation in the worldwide Anglican community over the issue and will be criticised as %22back-seat driving%22 by supporters of his successor at Canterbury%2C Dr Rowan Williams.%0D%0A %0D%0ALord Carey will bless the traditionalists %0D%0AIt will also raise the temperature of the debate weeks before the publication of the final report by the Lambeth Commission%2C the body set up last year by Dr Williams to try to avert schism.%0D%0ADr Carey is to confirm several hundred adults and children from 11 conservative parishes in Virginia which have rejected the ministry of their diocesan bishop%2C the Rt Rev Peter Lee%2C because of his support for the Rt Rev Gene Robinson%2C Anglicanism%27s first active homosexual bishop.”

I wonder. . . Could

I wonder. . . Could this:

7/07/04

Australian Anglicans back orthodox in Global South, U.S.

From Anglican Media Sydney

The Sydney Standing Committee has bolstered the heavyweight pressure being put on the Archbishop of Canterbury’s Lambeth Commission to penalise the Episcopal Church of the United States (ECUSA) over the controversial appointment of Bishop V. Gene Robinson.

After a lengthy debate in late May, Standing Committee resolved to support the conservative primates of the Global South – representing two-thirds of the Communion – in their call to the Lambeth Commission to urge ECUSA to turn back to God and withdraw from their election of openly gay Bishop Robinson.

Standing Committee also supported the Primates’ call to the Commission to invoke disciplinary action, if necessary, that could involve ECUSA’s expulsion from the Communion.

It supported the Primates’ view that such extreme action was necessary because Bishop Robinson’s appointment in the Diocese of New Hampshire last year demonstrated that ECUSA had ‘abandoned’ the teaching of Scripture as it relates to matters ‘necessary to salvation’.The Standing Committee therefore believes they need ‘to repent, and to rescind and revoke their election of Bishop Robinson’.

It also supports the maintenance of those parishes and dioceses ‘who are seeking to uphold the historic faith of the Anglican Communion as set forth in Holy Scripture’.

and this:

Anglicans drop lay presidency laws
By Paul Osborne
August 15, 2004

THE Sydney Anglican diocese has backed down on a move to pass laws to allow lay people to administer the bread and wine during church services.

But the diocese’s executive, the standing committee, has said it would not discipline any deacons or lay people who administered communion.
The Sydney diocese’s parliament, or synod, was expected to vote on legislation in October to allow non-priests to administer communion.

The standing committee last week made its decision not to press ahead with the laws after considering a report on attitudes to lay administration and the current legal situation.

But it will present a motion to the October synod setting out its support for lay administration. The motion states that “we believe there are good biblical, theological and practical grounds for introducing lay administration”.

It also says the law should allow that which the Bible allows and that until the law is changed, or it was determined no legal change was needed, “no disciplinary or other action should be taken against any person in relation to deacons or lay persons administering the Lord’s Supper (communion).

“Lay or diaconal administration is a legitimate expression of Anglicanism,” the motion says.

The issue has been hotly debated within the church for decades.

The Anglican Church’s highest legal body, the Appellate Tribunal, found by a majority in 1997 that lay presidency was consistent with the church’s constitution.

But it also found by a majority that a decision of the national church’s parliament, the General Synod, was needed before individual dioceses could go ahead with it.

Some sections of the church believe allowing lay people to administer the bread and wine removes elitism and could help sustain congregations in rural and remote areas where priests are unavailable.

But opponents say the Bible and tradition make it clear that only a priest or bishop should be able to preside.

AAP

be linked? My guess is that Sydny moved on lay presidency because it is as devisive as Vicki Gene and they recieved pressure from orthodox Bishops indicating that thier case and their support would be more clearly heard without this attendant conflict.

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