magnifying-glass

Fun with search terms

I’ve been getting more traffic on this post (sermon actually), which I wrote last year for The Sunday of the Passion: Palm Sunday.  Evidently there are a number of folks who would rather have Palm Sunday be only Palm Sunday and forgo the reading of the Passion Gospel on this day in favor of another occasion (logically, Good Friday, when we read it again) because, in addition to the comments on last year’s post, someone got to my blog today by searching:

“omit passion narrative on palm sunday episcopal” and others (?) by searching:

“passion gospel palm sunday or good friday?”

“rubrics reading of the passion story”

Interesting… I hope some folks will be encouraged to leave comments about why they’re looking to see if the rubrics allow the omission

  • http://twitter.com/gamma909 Jim Liberatore

    I believe Palm Sunday became Palm/Passion Sunday because most people skipped Good Friday, leaving the worshiper with Hosanna! (skip the crucifixion stuff) Hallelujah!, Sunday-Sunday experience. While some might prefer Christianity w/o The Cross, a week to really think about it isn’t a bad idea.

    • http://frjody.com Jody Howard

      Thanks Jim. I agree; I think that Holy Week (beginning with the Passion narrative on “Palm Sunday”) is indispensable, especially for us today, when we have a tendency to avoid the reality of suffering.

      Thanks for the comment. In your experience, have you had people-especially clergy colleagues–who have tried to find a way of leaving out the Passion Gospel on Palm Sunday? I wouldn’t have thought about it, until I saw that people were googling for it. I don’t think the Rubrics would allow for it–only for the shorter form of the Gospel reading…

  • http://twitter.com/gamma909 Jim Liberatore

    I believe Palm Sunday became Palm/Passion Sunday because most people skipped Good Friday, leaving the worshiper with Hosanna! (skip the crucifixion stuff) Hallelujah!, Sunday-Sunday experience. While some might prefer Christianity w/o The Cross, a week to really think about it isn’t a bad idea.

    • http://frjody.com Jody Howard

      Thanks Jim. I agree; I think that Holy Week (beginning with the Passion narrative on “Palm Sunday”) is indispensable, especially for us today, when we have a tendency to avoid the reality of suffering.

      Thanks for the comment. In your experience, have you had people-especially clergy colleagues–who have tried to find a way of leaving out the Passion Gospel on Palm Sunday? I wouldn’t have thought about it, until I saw that people were googling for it. I don’t think the Rubrics would allow for it–only for the shorter form of the Gospel reading…

  • http://twitter.com/annaavenhoward Anna Howard

    I quite like the hosanna to crucify him narrative just because it makes us all participate in our own fickleness as human beings and how the crowds that cheered his entry turned very quickly to wanting him crucified…

  • http://twitter.com/aehowardwrites A.E. Howard

    I quite like the hosanna to crucify him narrative just because it makes us all participate in our own fickleness as human beings and how the crowds that cheered his entry turned very quickly to wanting him crucified…

  • http://profiles.google.com/rev.david.h David Hansen

    Jody,
    I know of colleagues (of course under a very different set of rubrics) who have omitted the Passion narrative from the last Sunday of Lent. In some ways, I sympathize with the liturgical and pastoral arguments of both sides of the issue.

    Mark Mummert, a wonderful liturgist in our tradition (authored many things in our new worship book), posted this today: http://mummertmusingmusic.blogspot.com/2011/04/two-passions-each-year.html

    It touches on this issue, although it doesn’t get at it directly. Anyway, thought it might peak your interest.

    • http://frjody.com Jody Howard

      David,

      Thanks for pointing me toward Mark’s comments. His post touches on many of the same issues I’ve been discussing elsewhere, as well as a few I hadn’t thought of. I look forward to taking a closer look at his post in a day or two.

      Thanks for sharing. As you know from experience, we may have differences between our rubrics and variances in some of our liturgies, but our traditions do well to inform each other.

  • http://profiles.google.com/rev.david.h David Hansen

    Jody,
    I know of colleagues (of course under a very different set of rubrics) who have omitted the Passion narrative from the last Sunday of Lent. In some ways, I sympathize with the liturgical and pastoral arguments of both sides of the issue.

    Mark Mummert, a wonderful liturgist in our tradition (authored many things in our new worship book), posted this today: http://mummertmusingmusic.blogspot.com/2011/04/two-passions-each-year.html

    It touches on this issue, although it doesn’t get at it directly. Anyway, thought it might peak your interest.